A Gude Cause Maks A Strong Erm – watch online

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A Gude Cause Maks A Strong Erm

The story of the Orcadian Woman’s Suffrage Society

A Gude Cause Maks A Strong Erm, the animated story of the Orcadian Woman’s Suffrage Society, as told by The Orkney News is now available to watch online on YouTube.

Campaigning for women to have the right to vote took place from the latter half of the 19th Century up to the start of the First World War. Orcadian suffragists were part of that activism.

Researched and scripted by Fiona Grahame, the hand-painted animation by Martin Laird is stylised to make some reference to the world of 20th century art. The artist Stanley Cursiter was associated with the Orcadian Woman’s Suffrage Society, having designed its banner and married Phyllis Hourston, one of its members. The design of characters and locations was derived from period photos.

The narration by Orcadian Kim Foden is upbeat and enthusiastic. The original score by James Watson sets the perfect tempo for the flow of the animation.

The animation was made possible with an award from the Scottish Government’s Centenary Fund which supported projects celebrating 100 years of some women gaining the right to vote.

Fiona Grahame is the editor of The Orkney News, which is free to read online at https://theorkneynews.scot

Find James Watson on Facebook at Wooden Sole Music https://facebook.com/woodensolemusic/

Thank you to the staff at the Phoenix Cinema at the Pickaquoy Centre, who made it possible for A Gude Cause Maks A Strong Erm to premiere on the big screen in Kirkwall. It was shown alongside a week of films celebrating women in cinema, to coincide with International Women’s Day on the 8th of March 2019.

Still from A Gude Cause Maks A Strong Erm, the animated story of the Orcadian Woman's Suffrage Society, showing artist Stanley Cursiter with Phyllis Hourston
The artist Stanley Cursiter with Phyllis Hourston

Hoy

Photographs of Hoy

Photographs of Hoy taken in March 2019, on a bicycle trip to Rackwick. Although the weather was mild for the time of year, there were heavy and unpredictable downpours, and it was very windy on the clifftops at Rora Head and the Old Man of Hoy.

Animation premiere at the Phoenix Cinema

poster for A Gude Cause Maks A Strong Erm, the story of the Orcadian Woman's Suffrage Society. Showing at the Phoenix Cinema in the Pickaquoy Centre, Kirkwall, alongside selected films from 5th to 11th of March.
‘A Gude Cause Maks A Strong Erm’ launch poster

A Gude Cause Maks A Strong Erm premiere

International Women’s Day 2019 is on the 8th of March. To coincide with this the Phoenix Cinema at the Pickaquoy Centre in Kirkwall will be showing a week of films featuring female leads and directors.

A Gude Cause Maks A Strong Erm, the animated story of the Orcadian Woman’s Suffrage Society as told by The Orkney News, will be shown before these selected films. It premieres alongside Can You Ever Forgive Me, which stars Melissa McCarthy and Richard E Grant, and was directed by Marielle Heller.

Thank you to the staff at the Pickaquoy Centre who have made it possible to see the animation on the big screen. Thanks also to the Scottish Government Centenary Fund, without whom this project would not have happened.

Stromness

A view of Stromness from Cairston with the setting sun glowing behind a gap inteh clouds behind the hills of Hoy.
Setting December sun over Stromness & the Hoy hills

The great #Stromhole in the sky, fed by burning farm plastic.

Happy Valley – tribute to Edwin Harrold

Edwin Harrold riding his bicycle fast with his pet rook flying beside. Plants grow in his wake and a little boy waves at him.
Edwin Harrold, 1907-2005. Creator of Happy Valley. Pen, ink & gouache, 2018

A tribute to Edwin Harrold

Cartoon created for The Orkney News column in the July 2018 edition of iScot magazine, written by Fiona Grahame.

The quote, “What you don’t have, you don’t miss,” comes from an interview with Edwin Harrold’s former neighbour Ruby Spence, as outlined here.

Edwin Harrold was by all accounts quite a character. He lived a simple life at Bankburn Cottage off Bigswell Road, Stenness, in the West Mainland of Orkney. There he re-routed the Russadale Burn to power a small hydro-electric system to cover his modest electrical needs.

The area around Edwin’s house was landscaped to create a small woodland escape of a kind which is uncommon in Orkney. Visitors were welcome, and the magical-sounding Happy Valley no doubt left a lasting impression on many a young Orcadian.

Happy Valley is now maintained by the Friends of Happy Valley, a charitable organisation.

For more on Edwin Harrold’s life and work, read this months iScot magazine.

The Vore Tullye: the Sea Mither versus Teran

The Vore Tullye: the Sea Mither versus Teran

A pen and ink cartoon depicting the Spring battle between the Sea Mither and Teran - primal nature forces. The Sea Mither resembles Nicola Sturgeon and a sea anemone and has calmed the stormy seas. Teran has the face of Theresa May and is a giant monster thrashing it's flippers making waves.
The Vore Tullye. Pen and ink. Cartoon for The Orkney News column in the February 2018 edition of iScot magazine.

 

The Vore Tullye, or Spring Struggle, is a mythical battle between two primal nature deities described in the folklore of the Northern Isles of Scotland. It takes place every year, in March.

The Sea Mither is a benevolent spirit who calms the wind, stills the seas, and brings forth an abundance of fish. In Shetland, the Mither o’ the Sea was once invoked by fisherman for protection against the Devil (Marwick, 2000, p.19). She is depicted here as a small sea anemone-like humanoid with a serene, calming influence.

Teran is the Sea Mither’s opposite number: the raging embodiment of Winter. Teran is actually a male spirit, but the physical appearance of these beings has apparently not been handed down in folklore.

Teran is a huge sea monster with the cold, dead eyes of a shark, grasping tentacles, and barnacle-encrusted flippers with which to thrash the water and create stormy seas. It has a vicious, leech-like round orifice which is used both to eat, and excrete.

Following the Vore Tullye, Teran is overcome by the Sea Mither, bound, and confined to the bottom of the sea. The occasional unseasonal storm indicates the thrashing of the monster as it tries to escape.

Later in the year comes the Gore Vellye, or Autumn Tumult, when Teran breaks free once more and begins a new reign of terror (Towrie, 2018). The tyrant of Winter wreaks havoc through storms, gales, and dangerous high seas. The days grow short. People become depressed.

The cycle continues.

 

References

Marwick, E., 2000. The Folklore of Orkney and Shetland. Edinburgh: Birlann Limited.

Towrie, S., 2018. The Mither o’ the Sea. Orkneyjar. Available from http://www.orkneyjar.com/folklore/mither.htm

Cartoon: Tavish Scott and the PFI Ferry debacle

Tavish Scott and the PFI Ferry debacle

Pen and ink cartoon showing Tavish Scott and Nicola Sturgeon as Punch and Judy. Mr. Tavish is hitting Nicola with a newspaper and shouting about unfair ferry fares.
RET! RET! SNP Bad! Waaagh! – The Lib-Dem refrain.

 

This cartoon first appeared in the January 2018 edition of iScot magazine. It accompanies an article by Fiona Grahame of The Orkney News called “Owre the ferry tae the islands.” The subject of the article is the provision of lifeline ferry services in the Northern Isles, which has become a major issue at every election.

Ferry services are unceasingly used by the Lib-Dems as a stick with which to beat the SNP government. The term RET (Road Equivalent Tariff) is practically a catchphrase for them at this point. It has appeared regularly in letters and political columns in the local press, and in mountains of election material pushed through letter-boxes.

In fact, provision of an affordable ferry service with fares in line with the rest of Scotland is not something that is easily delivered. The Liberal Democrats themselves bear some responsibility for this – something they would no doubt rather people forget.

In 2005, Lib-Dem MSP for Shetland, Tavish Scott, was transport minister in the Labour/Lib-Dem coalition government which awarded the contract to Northlink to build new boats. Due to this PFI-style contract, the resulting ferries will end up costing the public £200 million – twice what they are worth. It seems the Royal Bank of Scotland gets to pocket the difference. To cap it off, the ferries are also inefficient and expensive to run.

According to the late Danus Skene, SNP candidate for Orkney & Shetland, a passenger travelling from Aberdeen to Lerwick is effectively subsidised by £300 – far more than the Western Isles. In addition, RET cannot be applied across the board to every ferry route in the Northern Isles. Some fares would go down, but others would go up.

This is still a live and somewhat controversial issue, but in October 2017 Humza Yousaf, Scottish Government minister for Transport and the Islands, announced that a fall in fares is coming in 2018.

On the 7th of February 2018, the RMT transport union will be holding talks with representatives from all political parties (except the Tories!) on the subject of nationalising the Northlink ferry routes.

Update 7th of February 2018: ferry fares were addressed in the recent Scottish Budget. For more information visit theorkneynews.scot

 

Photo of various election pamphlets received in the run-up to the 2016 Scottish Parliament elections. Ferry fares feature prominently. One is a fake newspaper called the "Orkney Gazette."
A small selection of Lib-Dem leaflets received in the run-up to the 2016 Scottish Parliament elections. Note the fake “Orkney Gazette” masquerading as a real newspaper.

 

Cracked bastion

cracked bastion, lino-cut martin scott laird 2017
Cracked bastion. Lino-cut, 15x20cm, 2017.

Cracked bastion

Cracked bastion is a lino-cut print inspired by the ruined wartime fortifications and twisted, wind-blasted trees which can be found throughout Orkney.

This print will be on display (and for sale) in the Christmas open exhibition at the Pier Arts Centre in Stromness, from the 18th of November to the 23rd of December, 2017.

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I ken whaur ye bide, beuy

Pen & ink cartoon by Martin Scott Laird for iScot Magazine, showing some immigrant geese and a local shooter.
“I ken whaur ye bide, beuy.”

 

I ken whaur ye bide, beuy.

This cartoon was drawn to accompany Fiona Grahame’s The Orkney News column in iScot magazine for December 2017. The subject of the article is the problem of goose management in Orkney, but the cartoon has a different subtext. It was inspired by a recent incident of racial abuse in which an incomer to Orkney was ordered to leave the islands, along with his family. “I know where you live” is threatening in any dialect.

With a population approaching 22,000, Orkney is a still a relatively small place. The inhabitants like to think of themselves as good people and most of them are. However there does exist a xenophobic dark side which occasionally rears its ugly head. There will be few “ferry-loupers” living in Orkney that have not experienced some degree of intolerance in person, however slight.

Orkney has very high rates of fuel poverty and an average income below the Scottish average. On the other hand, 3.5% of houses are second homes, and 6.9% are empty. Demographics have shifted to the point that an Orcadian accent is virtually unheard on some islands. This does not excuse xenophobia or resentment of incomers, but may go some way towards explaining it.

Some Orcadians can trace their lineage back to late Norse times, but it’s worth remembering that the Vikings were themselves immigrants to the islands (and not peaceful ones).