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Cartoon – The Wreck of the Crown of London

cartoon showing praying covenanters in the hold of the ship 'The Crown of London'. One says "Lord, let us not die slaves in an English colony." In the next panel a William-Blake inspired God sinks the ship and says "I really should just drown this entire Me-forsaken country."
The wreck of the ‘Crown of London’. Pen & ink, 2018.

 

Cartoon created to accompany The Orkney News article in the June 2018 edition of iScot magazine, about the Orkney connection to the Scottish Covenanters. The drawing references the dark artistic vision of William Blake. The figure of Urizen represents an aspect of God in Blake’s personal mythology.

The Covenanters were a 17th Century Scottish Presbyterian Christian sect. They were evangelical and militaristic, effectively governing Scotland for a time during the War of the Three Kingdoms. They also fought in the English Civil war, where they were defeated by the New Model Army of Oliver Cromwell.

The Covenanters did not recognise the Divine Right of monarchs to lead the Church, only Jesus. This caused them to fall foul of a succession of Kings – Charles I, Charles II, and James VII, who all tried to suppress their religious and rebellious activities.

During a period called The Killing Time, many Covenanters were executed or captured. 1200 of them were defeated at the Battle of Bothwell Brig, and 250 of these put aboard the Crown of London and sent into a life of slavery in the English colonies. They never made it. In 1679 the ship was wrecked in a storm off the coast of Deerness, in Orkney, at a headland called Scarvataing.

As the people were slaves, they were treated as cargo. The captain would be recompensed for their loss if they died, but not if they escaped. Therefore the hatches were ordered closed even as the ship foundered. One crew member did use an axe to break free some prisoners, and thanks to his efforts 47 of them survived. Most were recaptured, but some escaped and it is said their descendants still live in Orkney.

 

References

Scottish Covenanter Memorials Association, 2018. Who were the Covenanters? Available from http://www.covenanter.org.uk/whowere.html

The Reformation, 2018. The Bishops Wars and Wars of the Three Kingdoms (1639-1646)? Available from https://www.thereformation.info/bishopswars/

Towrie, S., 2018. The Covenanters and the Crown. Orkneyjar. Available from http://www.orkneyjar.com/history/covenant.htm

 

Art, design & animation. Contributor to The Orkney News and iScot magazine. Director of 'A Gude Cause Maks A Strong Erm', the animated story of the Orcadian Woman's Suffrage Society.

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